WILDLANDS PHILANTHROPY: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRADITION

WILDLANDS PHILANTHROPY: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRADITION


WILDLANDS PHILANTHROPY: THE GREAT AMERICAN TRADITION (USA, 2008, 17 min.)



Co-presented by the National Museum of American History



From Alaska to Patagonia, private philanthropy by American conservationists over the past century birthed many of our best-loved parks. Coming from diverse backgrounds but with a common concern for the future, unsung heroes saved nature the old fashioned way—by buying land and preserving it forever. The wild places they protected—from iconic national parks like Grand Teton and Acadia to lesser-known natural areas—are an enduring legacy and tangible symbol of our connection to the land. Through the land trust movement and a new generation of entrepreneurial philanthropists, this tradition is evolving to meet the next century’s land conservation challenges. Landscape Photography by Antonio Vizcaíno. Text and Narration by Tom Butler.

Shown with RED, WHITE & GREEN

Introduced by Jeffrey Stine, Chair, Division of Medicine and Science, National Museum of American History. Discussion with Tom Butler, Editorial Projects Director, Foundation for Deep Ecology, follows screening.

Ticket/Reservation Info:

FREE, no reservations needed.

National Portrait Gallery, Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium

Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture

Eighth & F Sts., NW

(METRO: Gallery Place/Chinatown)

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Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital