THIRSTY PLANET

Washington D.C. Premiere

THIRSTY PLANET

Solar Household Energy, Inc. & Solar Cookers International

THIRSTY PLANET (Solar Cooking project in Ghana and Benin, West Africa, 2006, 25 min.)

Washington, D.C. Premiere Highlighting the extraordinary work of local doctors Mercy Bannerman and Patrick Apoy, this documentary shows their work in villages where the local population is forced to draw drinking water from pools contaminated with parasites. Thirsty Planet reveals the surprising potential of solar ovens to pasteurize water. Locals who have to walk two to three kilometers in search of firewood for cooking are delighted to have solar cookers. Excitement moves through the towns as the people find that they can not only save on fuel costs but also preserve their forests by using the free and limitlessenergy of the sun. Directed by Edwin Carswell. Produced by Carswell Productions.

Shown as part of a program on solar cookers with MANDA’S PRIZE, CHARCOAL TRAFFIC & SOLAR COOKING IN BENDER BAYLA, and SOLAR COOKING IN MADAGASCAR, A MEANS TO HALT DEFORESTATION

Discussion with solar energy experts Louise Meyer, Founder and Board Member of Solar Household Energy and Pat McArdle, Board Member of Solar Household Energy and Solar Cookers International, follows screenings.

Ticket/Reservation Info:

FREE, no reservations needed.

Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives, Lecture Hall 102,

1201 17th St., NW (METRO: Farragut North)

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Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital