JOHN MUIR IN THE NEW WORLD

JOHN MUIR IN THE NEW WORLD

Bob Roney (c) Global Village Media

JOHN MUIR IN THE NEW WORLD (USA, 2011, 83 min.)

Preservationist, naturalist, author, explorer, activist, scientist and farmer John Muir (1838 – 1914) was all these things and more. Nearly a century after his death, this Scottish American is remembered and revered as the father of the environmental movement and the founder of the Sierra Club, the oldest and largest grassroots environmental organization in the United States. Examining his impact then and now, this documentary explores Muir’s life, influences and passion for nature with reenactments throughout the majestic landscapes he visited: Wisconsin, Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada, the Alhambra Valley of California and the glaciers of Alaska. A lover and champion of the American wilderness, Muir believed that it was the responsibility of citizens to protect their natural surroundings. Through his tireless advocacy and his writings, Muir helped preserve the Yosemite Valley, led the fight against the Hetch Hetchy dam – the first nationwide battle of the environmental movement – and was the force behind the creation of the National Park Service. (–American Masters, PBS) Written, directed and produced by Catherine Tatge. Executive Producer: Dominque Lasseur. A co-production of Global Village Media and THIRTEEN’s American Masters for WNET.

Introduced by Ian Cooke, Public Programs, National Portrait Gallery. Discussion with filmmakers Catherine Tatge and Dominique Lasseur, Executive Producer, Global Village Media.

Ticket/Reservation Info:

FREE. No reservations required.

National Portrait Gallery, Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium

Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture

Eighth & F Sts., NW

(Metro: Gallery Place/ Chinatown)

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Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital